Pre-Inca Ruins in Peru

Pre-Inca Ruins in Peru

The coastal pre-Incan ruins in the north of Peru are some of the most interesting sites I've ever visited. Most of them are newly discovered, and there are active digs at some. Because of this, you can see areas of a site that were unknown just a few months before your visit. When I asked one guide why we couldn't get as close to a mural as we had to other sections, she told me that they were still working on uncovering the rest of the mural.

The Incans apparently copied their irrigation systems from the coastal people, who lived in the desert and brought their water in from the mountains.

Serval of these sites and a couple of excellent museums are around Trujillo, a northern coastal city. I visited them using local transportation, with no difficulty. Among them are Chan Chan, on the road to the beach resort of Huaco.

 


Discovery

I have seen a show about this on Discovery Channel. There were a bunch of highly developed cultures in Peru. They had found this ancient battlefield near the northern coast of Peru and were trying to figure out what was going on.

The Inca are the best known but not the only powerful tribe in the area.

I have been to Pachacamac (near Lima). They too had a higly sophisticated culturue. They were coquered by the Inca but integrated into their society rather then destroyed.

I am always very interested in all pre-columbian civilizations in South America.

Andre

Travel Photography

 

I visited Ingapirca in

I visited Ingapirca in Ecuador, and it had the same sort of integration.  The guide said that the Inca policy was to force intermarriage between high-ranking Incas and the highest-ranks of a conquered city or culture, in order to promote stability.  Their other stabilizing tactic was to build and stock grain warehouses, providing their subjects with a guaranteed food supply.

One of the things that surprised me is that Inca rule lasted only about 100 years.  They built an amazing empire, but had extremely bad timing.  They barely got started when the Spaniards arrived.

cindy wrote:One of the

cindy wrote:

One of the things that surprised me is that Inca rule lasted only about 100 years.  They built an amazing empire, but had extremely bad timing.  They barely got started when the Spaniards arrived.

Yes, that always dazzled me too. They have risen from a tribe to the dominating power in South America in such a short time. They have accomplished architectural highlights that rivaled those of the Europeans of the time (if not exceeded).

I think the main reason for the demise of the Inca was their contant battles between each other. They simply didn't stand together to fight the Spaniards. Instead some took the side of the invaders.

Disease did the rest.

It boggles the mind how a few hundred Spaniards could enslave a whole people and a powerful too.

You sound like you have been all over South America. I have big plans too and I want to see most of it if possible.

Andre

Travel Photos

It's hard to imagine what

It's hard to imagine what it must have been like for them, to see these people with pale skin and different hair and eye colors, much taller (even now full grown men can be less than five feet tall), with horses and guns.  We know so much about the world, it's hard to interpret how isolated they were.